Quarantined sex with your partner Feat Nicky P

Many Americans aren’t quarantining with there partner and risks of exposure are much higher.. especially during sex. We would prefer that everyone wait until the pandemic has passed and America is back to normal before engaging in sexual activity. During these times it seems like we are 10x more horny and get the “urge” more often. And that’s ok! There’s ways to be safe about it . If you’re single go “rub one out” If you and your partner are both quarantining together and can’t resist, then at-least WRAP IT UP! If you are going to have sex we ask that you at-least wear protection. 

It’s still a bad idea to sleep with someone new, even if both of you have been social distancing. If you live with your partner and and you want to have sex you should consider their exposure risk first: Are they leaving the house? If so, is it to work in a situation with a higher exposure risk? Or if it’s simply to grocery shop, do they take steps to mitigate exposure, like social distancing and practicing good hand washing?

If you are at higher risk because of pre-existing conditions, I would consider these factors and then discuss them with your doctor so you can decide what makes the most sense for you given your health conditions and your living situation. Everyone should pay extra attention to house hygiene, cleaning surfaces after use, as well as hand hygiene, as these actions may help reduce transmission between members of the household.

We are definitely not Promoting or suggesting sexual activity during this time but there are a lot of Americans out there that still have sex and we just ask that you at-least wear protection and consider safer positions such as “Doggystyle” and “reverse cowboy”

According to a article by Dr Felice Gersh, “It’s different to have sex with a live-in partner or someone you’re self-quarantining with than it is to have sex with someone who you don’t know very well and who has to travel to get to you.” 

For couples who already share a bed, the possibility is incredibly high that if one person gets coronavirus, the other person will, too,” Gersh says.

“These couples need to determine whether the additional transfer risk that comes with having sex is worth it for them,” she adds.

And for some couples, the risk may be worth it.

But for couples where one or both people are immunocompromised and the dangers associated with getting the virus are high — it probably isn’t.